The Opioid Epidemic: Overprescribed and Breaking Society Down This Court Filing Explains It All


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In recent times court filings have been brought to light that seems to outline the opioid epidemic and what has been fueling it for so long. These files placed in federal court within Cleveland by lawyers working for cities that have been and are being affected drastically by the opioid epidemic. In these files, it is outlined properly how twisted corporate interests are.

An article written by The New York Times covered this topic quite extensively and chances are the things within it will shock you in ways you perhaps didn’t ever expect to experience. The first trial in all of this which is set to occur in October is going to be pretty cut and dry (although the drug companies involved will have the upperhand) we believe as both sides have gathered lots of evidence and might change things in a big way.

This whole ordeal could if things go in favor of the public allow for a national settlement that could award money to cities and towns to combat this issue and allow many to begin to work towards something finally. While these companies both big and small are supposed to monitor orders for opioids and other medications in general, those who filed this lawsuit say that it has not been done at all. It is even noted that in a town of 2,831 people orders of around 3,271 bottles of oxycodone were being sent out per month somehow.

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While a red flag for Barbara Martin who worked for a company that shipped these drugs out it seems her concerns were falling on deaf ears as just when she made officials aware another shipment went out the following month of the same stature. There are thousands of emails, documents, and so forth that will be used regarding this case, and we can only hope that things play out properly this go around. For far too long this murderous opioid epidemic has been claiming the lives of those we all love the most and it is not something that needs to persist further.

The NYT wrote as follows in their article covering this topic:

Before 2011, Walmart had no discernible system to monitor suspicious orders. the plaintiffs contended. The company said that it relied on its hourly employees, which the plaintiffs called a “farcical” claim with no evidence of training or policy in place.

By 2015, the company put a system of storewide limits in place, but it was so forgiving that a store could go from ordering 10 dosages of 10 milligrams of oxycodone in one month, to 7,999 dosages the next, without raising an alarm. In a filing Friday, Walmart said that its pharmacy business accounted “for a vanishingly small part of the relevant market” and noted that an expert for the plaintiffs had concluded that Walmart distributed less than 1.3 percent of the opioids distributed to the Ohio counties that brought the case.

By 2015, the company put a system of storewide limits in place, but it was so forgiving that a store could go from ordering 10 dosages of 10 milligrams of oxycodone in one month, to 7,999 dosages the next, without raising an alarm. In a filing Friday, Walmart said that its pharmacy business accounted “for a vanishingly small part of the relevant market” and noted that an expert for the plaintiffs had concluded that Walmart distributed less than 1.3 percent of the opioids distributed to the Ohio counties that brought the case.

But the plaintiffs alleged complicity across the opioid supply chain.

“Failure to identify suspicious orders was their business model,” they said of the defendants. “They turned a blind eye and called themselves mere ‘deliverymen’ with no responsibility for what they delivered or to whom. Just like any street drug courier.”

As billions of their pills poured into the country, generic manufacturers took a lax approach to tracking suspicious orders, the briefs for the plaintiffs said. They used faulty algorithms to flag questionable orders and frequently handed oversight to customer service employees and account managers, whose pay was tied to drug sales.

Many of the companies used rudimentary systems to flag orders, for example only singling out cases when a customer ordered more than two or three times the amount that it had in the past. Such systems did not comply with D.E.A. requirements, the plaintiffs said. They did not account for pharmacies that were already ordering inappropriately large quantities of opioids, and many of the tracking systems could be evaded by dividing orders into smaller quantities, or switching to new dosages.

To read the full article as noted above click here. There is a lot more to the opioid epidemic than people realize and educating ourselves is a step in the right direction. While it might not seem like much to those who have managed to remain unaffected, those who have lost loved ones to this are truly deserving of the changes that could possibly be to come.

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